Tuesday, 2 April 2013

HOW TO: SHORTEN A LOW PRESSURE HOSE

Have you ever bought a new low pressure hose as the one you had before was too long?  Imagine you’re setting up your very first twinset and you have plenty of spare regulator and/or wing/BCD hoses?  A standard regulator hose is 29” where a ‘DIR’ style backup hose is generally 22-24” (depending on first stage).  If you were to use the standard hose you would be left with a large loop that may snag.  I had the same problem when I was setting up my twinset and again this weekend when I was rebuilding the wife’s twinset.  To save yourself some money and recycle some of your existing hoses you can modify one with an AP50B from AP Valves; it allows the shortening of standard diameter low pressure hoses by cutting to length and screwing onto the end
The following guide is designed for a standard 3/8” UNF fitting for a standard first stage.  It has not been tried with the older style 1/2" Apeks fitting.

WARNING; THIS IS NOT TO BE USED WITH A HIGH PRESSURE HOSE

You will need the following:
1. Existing LP hose.
2. AP50B*.
3. A sharp knife.
4. 2x adjustable spanners.

*If you call the friendly Alison at AP Valves on 01326 561040 and part with £10.24 of your hard earned (or maybe not) money you’ll get one in the post the next day.



Cut off the old 3/8” UNF fitting ensuring the cut is completely straight.  To do this I measured the appropriate distance (in this case 22”) and marked it with a paint pen.  To double check it was the correct length I then donned the twinset, put the regulator in my mouth and got my wife to confirm where the hose met the first stage (ensuring I had a full range of head movement).



Unscrew the 2 parts of the AP50B and screw the outer all of the way onto the hose ensuring the end of the hose is flush with the inside of the fitting.  It takes a little bit of an effort as the screw thread needs to bite into the hose so bear with it.







Using both spanners; one to hold the outer in place and one to rotate the inner, screw the inner in place.  Again this takes a small bit of effort.










Once finished it should look similar to the one on the left.

Thanks for reading; hopefully this is of some use. 

rectotec take no responsibility for any injuries caused by incorrect fitting of this part.







The boring bit!
All opinions expressed in my articles are my own and may differ to other instructor’s and agency guidelines; by no means are they wrong and I would not wish to disrepute any of them.  This article is for information only and should not replace proper training.

Safe diving!

Timothy Gort
BSAC, PADI and SDI/TDI diver training
l Mob: 07968148261 l Email: tim@rectotec.co.uk l